Diff for "Running/LXC"

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Revision 57 as of 2011-08-03 05:16:35
Size: 5898
Editor: lifeless
Comment: better workaround
Revision 112 as of 2017-09-22 08:30:24
Size: 4165
Editor: cjwatson
Comment: production is on 16.04 now
Deletions are marked like this. Additions are marked like this.
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## page was copied from Running/VirtualMachine
This page explains how to set up and run Launchpad (for development) inside a LXC.
This page explains how to set up and run Launchpad (for development) inside an LXC container. LXC is the recommended environment for doing Launchpad development in; the core Launchpad team and CI infrastructure all use LXC extensively. If your setup permits it, you should use [[Running/LXD]] instead, which is the recommended setup and what most developers currently use.
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Launchpad development setup makes significant changes to your machine; its nice to be unaffected by those except when you are actually doing such development. Launchpad development setup makes significant changes to your machine; it's nice to be unaffected by those when you're not doing such development. Also, multiple containers can be used to work around Launchpad's limitations regarding concurrent test runs on a single machine.
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Also, launchpad has some limitations on concurrent testing per-machine and so forth - multiple container's can be used to work around this. These instructions should work Ubuntu 14.04 LTS or later, and with some adaptation on any Linux distribution that uses LXC 1.0.0 or later. Older versions of LXC are significantly less reliable and polished, so we recommend upgrading to 14.04 LTS and removing `/var/cache/lxc` to ensure a clean, working start.
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= Make a LXC = = Create an LXC container =
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 1. Install lxc  1. Install LXC's userspace tools.
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 1. Work around Bug:800456 (fixed in oneiric) and Bug:801002  1. Create a container. You can use an HTTP proxy or alternate Ubuntu mirror by specifying an http_proxy or MIRROR environment variable after `sudo`. (amd64 works fine too, although it will use more RAM.)
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sudo apt-get install cgroup-bin libvirt-bin sudo lxc-create -t ubuntu -n lpdev -- -r xenial -a i386 -b $USER
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 1. Work around Bug:784093 (fixed in oneiric - doing this will break oneiric)  1. Start the container in the background.
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sudo dd of=/etc/cgconfig.conf << EOF
mount {
 cpu = /sys/fs//cgroup/cpu;
 cpuacct = /sys/fs/cgroup/cpu;
 devices = /sys/fs/cgroup/cpu;
 memory = /sys/fs/cgroup/cpu;
}
EOF
sudo service cgconfig restart
sudo lxc-start -n lpdev -d
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 1. Work around Bug:798476 (fixed in oneiric) (optional if you run i386 or have a -tonne- of memory and don't care about 64-bit footprint.
    Grab the patch from the bug and apply it to /usr/lib/lxc/templates/lxc-lucid. If you're running i386 already or want a 64-bit lxc then do not pass arch= on the lxc-create command line.
 1. Find its IP address.
 {{{
sudo lxc-ls --fancy
}}}
    
 1. `ssh -A IP_ADDRESS_FROM_LXC_LS` to connect to the container. Your username and password will match your account on the host system. If your SSH key is in your local `authorized_keys` file you shouldn't be prompted for a password, as your home directory (including public and private keys) is bind mounted into the container. The `-A` permits you to access Launchpad code hosting from within the container without needing to reenter passphrases.
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 1. Create a config for your containers  1. '''[Inside the container]''' Install Bazaar so you can run `rocketfuel-setup`.
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sudo dd of=/etc/lxc/local.conf << EOF
lxc.network.type=veth
lxc.network.link=virbr0
lxc.network.flags=up
#fuse (workaround for Bug:800886 (fixed in oneiric))
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 10:229 rwm
# part of the Bug:798476 workaround -
# remove if you are running a 64 bit lxc or
# 32 bit on 32-bit base os
lxc.arch = i686
EOF
 sudo apt-get install bzr
}}}

 1. '''[Inside the container]''' You can now follow the normal [[Running|LP installation instructions]]. Be warned that changes in your home directory will also be seen outside the container and vice versa. If your home directory already has a Launchpad work area set up you'll want to run `rocketfuel-setup --no-workspace` to avoid trying to recreate it, but all subsequent steps are still required.

 1. Follow [[Running/RemoteAccess]] to set up access from the host's applications to the container's Launchpad instance.

== Assigning a static IP to the container ==

If you would like to assign a static IP to the container via dhcp:

  1. In `/etc/default/lxc-net` ensure the following lines are uncommented:
  {{{
LXC_DHCP_CONFILE=/etc/lxc/dnsmasq.conf
LXC_DOMAIN="lxc"
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 1. Create a container [oneiric]
 {{{
sudo lxc-create -t ubuntu -n lucid-test-lp -f /etc/lxc/local.conf -- -r lucid -a i386 -b robertc
  2. Create `/etc/lxc/dnsmasq.conf` and add the following line (change IP to suit):
  {{{
dhcp-host=lpdev,10.0.3.210
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   If you want a proxy:
   {{{
sudo http_proxy=http://host:port/ lxc-create -t ubuntu -n lucid-test-lp -f /etc/lxc/local.conf -- -r lucid -a i386 -b robertc
  3. Stop '''all''' lxc containers (lxc-net may not correctly restart if any containers are running):
  {{{
sudo lxc-stop --name lpdev
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    And if you want to set a custom mirror, similar to http_proxy, but set MIRROR= instead.   4. Run `sudo service lxc-net restart` and start the container.
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 1. Create a container [natty]
 {{{
sudo arch=i386 lxc-create -n lucid-test-lp -t lucid -f /etc/lxc/local.conf
}}}
    If you want to use a proxy
 {{{
sudo arch=i386 http_proxy=http://host:port/ lxc-create -n lucid-test-lp -t lucid -f /etc/lxc/local.conf
}}}
    And if you want to set a custom mirror, similar to http_proxy, but set MIRROR= instead.
The lpdev container should restart with the specified IP.
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 1. [natty only] (Outside the container) grab your user id and username so you can setup a bind mount outside the container:
 {{{
id -u
id -nu
Alternatively, a static IP can be configured directly in the container from `/var/lib/lxc/lpdev/rootfs/etc/network/interfaces`.

= Troubleshooting =

<<Anchor(postgresql-locale-breakage)>>
== launchpad-database-setup fails ==

PostgreSQL will fail to create a cluster during installation if your
locale is configured to something non-C but not supported by the
container, so you need to install the relevant language pack.

Modern LXC container templates do this automatically, but you will know
you need to do it manually if bzr or apt commands have been spewing locale
warnings.

For instance, if your computer has a localised English locale, use this:

{{{
apt-get install language-pack-en
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 1. Start the container
 {{{
sudo lxc-start -n lucid-test-lp
}}}
    Ignore the warning about openssh crashing - it restarts on a later event.
    The initial credentials are root:root.

 1. Grab the ip address (handed out via libvirt's dhcp server) - you may wish to ssh in rather than using the console (seems to have better termcap experience).
 {{{
ip addr show dev eth0 | grep 'inet'
}}}

 1. The new container won't have your proxy / mirror settings preserved. Customise it at this point before going further if you care about this.

 1. Enable multiverse (rocketfuel-setup wants it, don't ask me why).

 1. Install some additional packages we'll need to run rocketfuel-setup etc.
 {{{
apt-get install python-software-properties
apt-add-repository ppa:ubuntu-virt
apt-get update
# oneiric:
apt-get install bzr less sudo
# oneiric if you have a localised (non-C) locale:
# not doing this will cause postgresql to fail to install, with -hilarious- results as database-developer-setup will think you have 8.2 installed.
# You can tell if you need this if the prior apt commands spewed locale warnings.
# Pick your specific language pack.
apt-get install language-pack-en

# natty
apt-get install bzr less sudo lxcguest
# select I for 'install' when prompted about console.conf
}}}

 1. Inside the container add the user [natty only]:
 {{{
adduser --uid $id $username
}}}

 1. Inside the container grant the user sudo rights:
 {{{
adduser $username sudo
}}}

 1. Workaround Bug:819621 [oneiric only]:
 {{{
 wget https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/lxc/+bug/819621/+attachment/2250880/+files/lxcmount.conf -o /etc/init/lxcmount.conf
 }}}
 
 1. natty only: To stop it now run 'poweroff -n'

 1. oneiric only: To stop it now run sudo lxc-stop -n lucid-test-lp (Bug:819621 more or less).

 1. natty only: Setup a bind mount so you can access your home dir (and thus your LP source code) from within the lxc container:
    * edit /var/lib/lxc/lucid-test-lp/fstab
    * Add a line:
 {{{
/home/$username /var/lib/lxc/lucid-test-lp/rootfs/home/$username none bind 0 0
}}}
 
 1. Start it up again - headless now, we have the ip address from before.
 {{{
sudo lxc-start -n lucid-test-lp -d
}}}

 1. ssh <vm IP address> to connect to the VM. Your ssh key is already present because of the bind mount to your home dir.

 1. You can now follow the [[Getting|getting-started]] on LP instructions. Be warned that changes in ~ will affect you outside the container. You will want to run rocketfuel-setup with --no-workspace if your home already has a workarea. You may need to run utilities/launchpad-database-setup separately too.

 1. You probably want to follow [[Running/RemoteAccess]] has a discussion for how you can configure things so your non-container browser can access web pages from within the container.

 1. rabbitmq may fail to start up. If that happens it appears to be a [[http://lists.rabbitmq.com/pipermail/rabbitmq-discuss/2010-April/007024.html|mnesia glitch]] best sorted by zapping mnesia.
 {{{
sudo rm -rf /var/lib/rabbitmq/mnesia/rabbit/*
sudo service rabbit-mq start
}}}

= References =


= Alternatively =

You can also run in a [[Running/Schroot|chroot]] environment or a [[Running/VirtualMachine|VM]].
If you didn't install the language pack before running rocketfuel-setup,
you'll need to run `sudo pg_createcluster 9.3 main` afterwards to fix
the damage.

This page explains how to set up and run Launchpad (for development) inside an LXC container. LXC is the recommended environment for doing Launchpad development in; the core Launchpad team and CI infrastructure all use LXC extensively. If your setup permits it, you should use Running/LXD instead, which is the recommended setup and what most developers currently use.

Why?

Launchpad development setup makes significant changes to your machine; it's nice to be unaffected by those when you're not doing such development. Also, multiple containers can be used to work around Launchpad's limitations regarding concurrent test runs on a single machine.

These instructions should work Ubuntu 14.04 LTS or later, and with some adaptation on any Linux distribution that uses LXC 1.0.0 or later. Older versions of LXC are significantly less reliable and polished, so we recommend upgrading to 14.04 LTS and removing /var/cache/lxc to ensure a clean, working start.

Create an LXC container

  1. Install LXC's userspace tools.
    sudo apt-get install lxc
  2. Create a container. You can use an HTTP proxy or alternate Ubuntu mirror by specifying an http_proxy or MIRROR environment variable after sudo. (amd64 works fine too, although it will use more RAM.)

    sudo lxc-create -t ubuntu -n lpdev -- -r xenial -a i386 -b $USER
  3. Start the container in the background.
    sudo lxc-start -n lpdev -d
  4. Find its IP address.
    sudo lxc-ls --fancy
  5. ssh -A IP_ADDRESS_FROM_LXC_LS to connect to the container. Your username and password will match your account on the host system. If your SSH key is in your local authorized_keys file you shouldn't be prompted for a password, as your home directory (including public and private keys) is bind mounted into the container. The -A permits you to access Launchpad code hosting from within the container without needing to reenter passphrases.

  6. [Inside the container] Install Bazaar so you can run rocketfuel-setup.

     sudo apt-get install bzr
  7. [Inside the container] You can now follow the normal LP installation instructions. Be warned that changes in your home directory will also be seen outside the container and vice versa. If your home directory already has a Launchpad work area set up you'll want to run rocketfuel-setup --no-workspace to avoid trying to recreate it, but all subsequent steps are still required.

  8. Follow Running/RemoteAccess to set up access from the host's applications to the container's Launchpad instance.

Assigning a static IP to the container

If you would like to assign a static IP to the container via dhcp:

  1. In /etc/default/lxc-net ensure the following lines are uncommented:

    LXC_DHCP_CONFILE=/etc/lxc/dnsmasq.conf
    LXC_DOMAIN="lxc"
  2. Create /etc/lxc/dnsmasq.conf and add the following line (change IP to suit):

    dhcp-host=lpdev,10.0.3.210
  3. Stop all lxc containers (lxc-net may not correctly restart if any containers are running):

    sudo lxc-stop --name lpdev
  4. Run sudo service lxc-net restart and start the container.

The lpdev container should restart with the specified IP.

Alternatively, a static IP can be configured directly in the container from /var/lib/lxc/lpdev/rootfs/etc/network/interfaces.

Troubleshooting

launchpad-database-setup fails

PostgreSQL will fail to create a cluster during installation if your locale is configured to something non-C but not supported by the container, so you need to install the relevant language pack.

Modern LXC container templates do this automatically, but you will know you need to do it manually if bzr or apt commands have been spewing locale warnings.

For instance, if your computer has a localised English locale, use this:

apt-get install language-pack-en

If you didn't install the language pack before running rocketfuel-setup, you'll need to run sudo pg_createcluster 9.3 main afterwards to fix the damage.

Running/LXC (last edited 2017-09-22 08:30:24 by cjwatson)